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Costello on Transportation: Thursday’s show (February 12, 2015)

Stephen Costello is an at-large member of the Houston City Council. He’s also expected to make fully official his run for mayor later this month. And he’s just recently been elected to chair a Houston-Galveston Area Council group tasked with developing and approving transportation plans for the HGAC’s eight county region. In those capacities, and as […]

Stephen Costello is an at-large member of the Houston City Council. He’s also expected to make fully official his run for mayor later this month. And he’s just recently been elected to chair a Houston-Galveston Area Council group tasked with developing and approving transportation plans for the HGAC’s eight county region. In those capacities, and as an engineer by trade, Costello has a lot to say about how transportation works – or doesn’t work – in Greater Houston today.

On this edition of Houston Matters, we present a wide-ranging discussion with Council Member Costello about transportation issues in the region.

Also this hour…According to the Pew Research Center, the number of Americans who have never been married is at a historic high. Data from Pew in 2010 shows that, of the couples walking down the aisle, 15 percent of new marriages today are interracial. 48 years after the Supreme Court ruled in favor of Mildred and Richard Loving’s marriage, Houston Matters’ producer Paige Phelps looks at how interracial marriage has changed for two couples here in Houston.

Plus: From the News 88.7 FM Education Desk, Laura Isensee reports on two views of the state of HISD’s schools, from Superintendent Terry Grier, and activists critical of an over-reliance on standardized testing.

Houston Public Media health and science reporter Carrie Feibel talks with Houstonians trying to purchase health insurance, amid a surge of enrollment in Texas in advance of Sunday’s deadline.

And: We talk with Penny Edgell, a Professor of Sociology at the University of Minnesota. She recently gave a lecture hosted by Rice University’s Religion and Public Life Program on her work addressing Americans’ attitudes about public religious expression, and what her research suggests is a growing divide between people of faith and the non-religious.

(MORE: In November, Houston Matters presented a pair of conversations featuring people who turned to – or away from – organized religion. We spoke with a one-time Atheist who later became an Episcopal priest. Then, we spoke with the author of a guide to coming out as an atheist, who was raised in a church-going household).

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