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Sheriff Garcia, Campaign Finance and Spacing Out: Friday’s show (February 6, 2015)

A little under a year ago we spoke with Houston Police Chief Charles McClelland and Harris County Sheriff Adrian Garcia about crime in Houston. We looked at how it’s investigated, how it’s monitored and some of the trends in crime locally. On Thursday (2/5/15), we revisited that conversation with Houston Police Chief Charles McClelland, and […]

A little under a year ago we spoke with Houston Police Chief Charles McClelland and Harris County Sheriff Adrian Garcia about crime in Houston. We looked at how it’s investigated, how it’s monitored and some of the trends in crime locally.

On Thursday (2/5/15), we revisited that conversation with Houston Police Chief Charles McClelland, and so, on this edition of Houston Matters, we do the same with Harris County Sheriff Adrian Garcia. We’ll welcome your questions for Sheriff Garcia, as we discuss crime and policing in Harris County.

Then: With the new legislative session well underway, we take a closer look at one group’s allegations that the finances of a number of Texas lawmakers’ political campaigns should face more scrutiny for what the group believes may be illegal or unethical expenditures.

Plus: From an increasing percentage of Texas energy coming from the wind, to the latest developments in the trial over Houston’s Equal Rights Ordinance, to HISD police getting body cameras and the U.S. Geological Survey raising it’s official risk level for earthquakes in Texas: we discuss The Good, The Bad and The Ugly of this week’s Houston news.

And we consider the value of being bored. In today’s technology-saturated society, what’s the importance of getting enough downtime, unattached to a device? Not just to spend more “quality time” with the family – the common reason cited for taking a break from the smart phone, but for some good old-fashioned “spacing out?” We’ll talk with Dr. Eugene Boisaubin from the UTHealth McGovern Center for Humanities and Ethics, about the need for your mind to – occasionally – go idle.

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