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Confederate Names and Symbols and Your Dental Questions: Houston Matters for Thursday, Sept. 11, 2014

Earlier this year, HISD unveiled new mascots at four district schools, as part of a policy banning mascots deemed culturally offensive. But it’s not just mascots that can offend some Houstonians. Some question whether schools here should be named after figures from Confederate history – examples include Lee High School, named after General Robert E. […]

Earlier this year, HISD unveiled new mascots at four district schools, as part of a policy banning mascots deemed culturally offensive. But it’s not just mascots that can offend some Houstonians. Some question whether schools here should be named after figures from Confederate history – examples include Lee High School, named after General Robert E. Lee. Davis High School is named for the President of the Confederacy, Jefferson Davis.

It’s an issue a school board in Jacksonville, Florida, faced, changing Nathan Bedford Forrest High – named for a Confederate general and early KKK leader – to what is now called, simply, Westside High School.

We discuss the history of Confederate names and symbols in Greater Houston, and consider if some schools named after such figures should be re-named. We also consider whether putting someone’s name on a public building amounts to an endorsement of that person’s life or legacy? And we contemplate if such name changes are culturally sensitive, or political correctness run amok.

Also this hour: Tooth hurt? We offer you an opportunity to get your dental questions answered. We talk with Dr. Ryan Quock, Associate Professor and Vice Chair of the Restorative Dentistry and Prosthodontics Department at UT Health.

Plus: Houston’s literary scene has a new writing center. Writespace opened its doors in May and is located in Houston’s Art District. It offers writing workshops, consulting services, a shared quiet space to write, and free community events. Houston Matters’ Maggie Martin sits down with Founder and Director Elizabeth White-Olsen to learn more about what Writespace is adding to Houston’s creative space.

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