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Austin Tice and Talk to the Family Doctor: Houston Matters for Thurs., Aug. 14, 2014

Two years ago today, Houston native and freelance journalist Austin Tice disappeared while covering the conflict in Syria. Tice grew up dreaming of becoming an international correspondent for NPR. That dream became his parents’ nightmare when Tice vanished. While many believe he was kidnapped, there has been no indication of what happened to him since a video […]

Two years ago today, Houston native and freelance journalist Austin Tice disappeared while covering the conflict in Syria. Tice grew up dreaming of becoming an international correspondent for NPR. That dream became his parents’ nightmare when Tice vanished.

While many believe he was kidnapped, there has been no indication of what happened to him since a video surfaced six weeks after he disappeared, seeming to suggest he was being held by Islamic militants. Some believe that video may have been faked. If he’s being held, by the Syrian regime or by its opposition, there has been no ransom, no public word of any kind.

On this edition of Houston Matters, in advance of this second anniversary of his disappearance, we talk with Debra and Marc Tice about their son, about his budding journalism career, what motivated him to want to report from a Syria that had grown increasingly dangerous for journalists, and what life has been like in the two years since he vanished.

Also this hour: We welcome your questions for pediatrician Dr. Mfon Ekong, assistant professor of pediatrics at The UT Health Science Center at Houston, and a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Any question you might ask your own family doctor about the health and well-being of your children will be welcome.

And: We share some feedback from your fellow listeners about recent programs, including some thoughts from Wayne Dolcefino, President of Dolcefino Consulting. The former longtime investigative reporter for KTRK ABC 13 has been consulting and investigating for opponents of the proposed landfill off Highway 6 near Hempstead in Waller County, northwest of Houston. He tells us why he thinks the landfill is not a “NIMBY” (Not In My Back Yard) issue, a topic we explored last week.

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