Full Show

Waller County Landfill, NIMBY, and Juries: Houston Matters for Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014

An ongoing battle over a proposed landfill in Waller County underscores how “NIMBYism” plays into so many important issues and ideas. From landfills to power plants, prisons to shopping malls, airports to seaports, there are all manner of developments that some communities may find valuable, provided they’re located someplace else. Toxic waste dump? Sure! Just “not […]

An ongoing battle over a proposed landfill in Waller County underscores how “NIMBYism” plays into so many important issues and ideas. From landfills to power plants, prisons to shopping malls, airports to seaports, there are all manner of developments that some communities may find valuable, provided they’re located someplace else. Toxic waste dump? Sure! Just “not in my backyard.”

On this edition of Houston Matters, we learn about the battle over the proposed landfill in Waller County. We discuss the pros and cons of the landfill with Joe Bennatte, Publisher of the Waller County News Citizen. Then, we’ll examine how the NIMBY concept plays out in other ways throughout Greater Houston, with attorney Kyle Bryant, and architecture professor Susan Rogers.

Also this hour: a lot changes in the world over 60 years. Take juries. Until the 1950s in Texas, juries were made up of only white men. Women were barred from serving on juries until 1954. African-Americans couldn’t serve on juries until even later in the 50s. As we note the 60th anniversary of women first serving on juries, we talk about jury service in Texas – and about the first woman in Texas to serve on a jury, which happened in Harris County. We welcome your questions for Harris County District Clerk Chris Daniel.

And: The Houston Museum of African-American Culture is displaying an exhibit marking the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act called African American Treasures from The Kinsey CollectionIt’s on loan from the Kinsey family through October. Los Angeles natives Bernard, Shirley, and Khalil Kinsey put this collection together over the course of 35 years. Houston Matters’ Edel Howlin will have a report.

Share