News

Case Ruling Will Not Stop Ashby High-Rise Construction

Neighbors upset because planned high-rise condo project will proceed.

Listen

To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:

<iframe src="https://embed.hpm.io/91121/50796" style="height: 115px; width: 100%;"></iframe>
X

Ashby-high-rise-lot.jpg
Ashby high-rise lot

Leading up to Wroxton Street near Rice University, are signs posted near the empty lot on Bissonnet. One reads, “1717updates.com”, another one says, “Got Traffic? Just wait.”

Stop Ashby high-rise sign
Sign reads: “Got Traffic? Just wait. Stop Ashby High Rise.org”

The homes behind the fenced lot are a mixture of new and old architecture, and the streets are lined with tall trees and landscaped lawns.

PJ Bell looked up from his driveway and imagined how the empty skyline will soon change.

“There’s nothing around here that’s 21-floors high. It’s going to be an eye sore. It’s going to be a traffic problem. During business hours, trying to get off of Ashby on to Bissonnet can take several minutes and that’s under the current situation. When they get all these people in here, in this high-rise, it’s going to get even worse.”

Phyllis Epps’s house is located at the corner and within walking distance of the planned high rise.

“I was surprised and disappointed that the system would reward developers that had shown such contempt for the regulatory system that’s in place to protect the public interest, as well as, the persons that they know, and the persons that they did not know, who reside within the community.”

But Matthew Morgan, president of Buckhead Investments, developers of the project, sees it differently.

construction info sign
Sign reads: “For construction information visit, 1717updates.com”

“Houston has been a wonderful experiment in urban planning where the market has generally dictated where development happens, but you do it in a way without the corruption and the bureaucratic red tape that accompanies that form of land use control.”

Laurie Pipenur was walking her two Dalmatians past the site. She’s been a resident of the neighborhood for 25 years, and realizes things will soon change here.

“This is such a lovely neighborhood and there’s so many people walking and we have a real sense of community, and the traffic alone and the construction will just really affect the way we live our lives around here.”

 

Subscribe to Today in Houston

Fill out the form below to subscribe our new daily editorial newsletter from the HPM Newsroom.

* required

Share