This article is over 8 years old

Energy & Environment

Alberta’s Oil Could Head East If White House Blocks Keystone

The Obama Administration is still weighing whether to grant TransCanada final approval for construction of the Keystone XL pipeline, which would link the Alberta oil sands to the Texas Gulf Coast.

Listen

To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:

<iframe src="https://embed.hpm.io/90379/49631" style="height: 115px; width: 100%;"></iframe>
X

Keystone-Pipeline-System-2013-02-20.jpg

The Obama Administration is still weighing whether to grant TransCanada final approval for construction of the Keystone XL pipeline, which would link the Alberta oil sands to the Texas Gulf Coast. Much of the pipeline is already in place.

What’s missing is the cross-border section, connecting Alberta to Steele City, Nebraska.

TransCanada CEO Russ Girling says the primary market for Canadian heavy crude oil should be the refineries of the Gulf Coast. But he says Canada, and TransCanada, have other options.

“With these delays in the Keystone [XL] pipeline, Canada has looked for other alternatives to move its product to market. There’s a number of proposals to move via pipeline to the West Coast. We’ve recently announced our Energy East project, which will move production all the way from Alberta through to New Brunswick. It’ll go through the refining centers of Quebec — Montreal and Quebec City — as well as the refineries in New Brunswick. It’ll also allow us to feed Eastern U.S. refineries with western crudes.”

The State Department issued a report in January, dropping environmental objections to the Keystone XL pipeline. The White House is expected to issue a final ruling on whether to permit construction later this year.

Subscribe to Today in Houston

Fill out the form below to subscribe our new daily editorial newsletter from the HPM Newsroom.

* required

Andrew Schneider

Andrew Schneider

Politics and Government Reporter

Andrew heads Houston Public Media's coverage of national, state, and local elections. He also reports on major policy issues before the Texas Legislature and county and city governments across Greater Houston. Before taking up his current post, Andrew spent five years as Houston Public Media's business reporter, covering the oil...

More Information