This article is over 11 years old

News

Abbott Proposes Bill to Change Penalty For Teenage ‘Sexting’

The state attorney general is supporting a bill to change ‘sexting’ between teenagers from a felony to a misdemeanor. The bill also calls for better education for teens on the dangers of using cell phones to send sexually explicit pictures or messages. David Pitman has more.

Listen

To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:

<iframe src="https://embed.hpm.io/74760/25630" style="height: 115px; width: 100%;"></iframe>
X

Under current Texas law, teenagers who send nude pictures of themselves or someone else would face third-degree felony charges of trafficking child pornography.  And, if convicted, would have to serve time in a state prison and register as a sex offender for life.

State Attorney General Greg Abbott says he can’t recall any teens actually being prosecuted under that law.  But it’s happened in other states.  And Abbott says there’s no reason why teenagers should have their lives ruined over sexting.

He’s endorsing a bill introduced this week by Democratic State Representative Kirk Watson of Austin.  It would change sexting for a first-time underage violator from a felony to a class-c misdemeanor.  Teens could have their convictions wiped from the record after completing a court-ordered education program, along with their parents.

School districts would also be required to enlighten teens on why sexting is a bad idea.  Those programs would be developed and paid for with money that’s already in the state budget.

Subscribe to Today in Houston

Fill out the form below to subscribe our new daily editorial newsletter from the HPM Newsroom.

* required

David Pitman

David Pitman

Host & Announcer

David was HPM's local Morning Edition host from 2009 to 2020 — when he was moved to the position of Technical Director of Houston Matters with Craig Cohen, and Town Square with Ernie Manouse. David has extensive public and commercial broadcast journalism and production experience dating back to 1993 –...

More Information