Housing

New affordable housing complex opens in southwest Houston

New Hope Housing Savoy is a four-story, 120-unit apartment complex in the Gulfton and Sharpstown area, designed to serve disabled Houstonians, families at risk of homelessness and children and families fleeing domestic violence.

New Hope Housing Savoy
Ashley Brown/Houston Public Media
New Hope Housing Savoy opened Oct. 12, 2023, at 6315 Savoy Dr. in Houston.

A new affordable housing development opened Thursday in southwest Houston. The development was created to house some of the city’s most vulnerable residents.

New Hope Housing Savoy is a $33.8 million apartment complex in Houston’s Gulfton and Sharpstown area. The four- story, 120-unit complex will house disabled individuals, families at risk of homelessness, and children and families fleeing domestic violence through a partnership with the Houston Area Women's Center. Families or individuals who earn between 30%-60% of the area's median income would qualify to live in the community,

"There is absolutely no reason that anyone in the wealthiest country in the history of the world should be living on the street, and that’s what begins to happen when you don’t have an affordable place to live," said Joy Horak-Brown with New Hope Housing.

According to Horak-Brown, the average age of the head of household at the complex is 41, and the average income of the head of household is just over $33,000.

“We are serious about doing deeply affordable housing," Horak-Brown said. "Fifty percent of the people you see are renters and of that 50 percent, half of them are rent burdened with more than 30 percent of their income in rent. A quarter of them are severely rent burdened with more than 50 percent of their income in rent – and that needs to stop."

The community includes a resident service program, free of charge, that will work with residents providing them with case management, referral services, and basic needs. Mayor Sylvester Turner said the complex fills a critical need for more affordable housing in Houston.

"You can’t address homelessness without providing people with the affordable means in which to live in a home, and this particular development will do just that," he said.

The city contributed $13.2 million in Community Development Block Grant funds from 2017. According to New Hope Housing, the property is 98% occupied and this Saturday, all units will be 100% filled.

"One hundred percent leased speaks volumes on the need that exists within our community," Turner said.

Added Paul Young, the chief of staff for Houston City Council member Edward Pollard, who represents the area: "Thank you for all the commitment, the contributions, and the patience it took to get to this point today. It's my honor and pleasure to hopefully in District J to see the complex will be full pretty soon – and we want to welcome them just in a couple of days."

Turner said his administration has exceeded his goal of adding 7,000 multifamily units, with more than 10,000 new units in Houston since he was first elected mayor in 2015.