Houston Matters

Why Do So Many Test Cases from Texas End Up at the Supreme Court?

The U.S. Supreme Court last week (Dec. 8 and 9, 2015) heard oral arguments in two cases that stem from Texas. One, Evenwel v. Abbott, deals with how legislative districts are drawn – and it could have a profound effect on future elections. The other, Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, deals with affirmative […]

The U.S. Supreme Court last week (Dec. 8 and 9, 2015) heard oral arguments in two cases that stem from Texas. One, Evenwel v. Abbott, deals with how legislative districts are drawn – and it could have a profound effect on future elections. The other, Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, deals with affirmative action at universities.

To help us understand the possible implications of these cases – and why so many test cases from Texas often end up before the nation's highest court – Michael Hagerty spoke with Rocky Rhodes from South Texas College of Law, who started by summarizing the redistricting case.

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Michael Hagerty

Michael Hagerty

Senior Producer, Houston Matters

Michael Hagerty is the senior producer for Houston Matters. He's spent more than 20 years in public radio and television and dabbled in minor league baseball, spending four seasons as the public address announcer for the Reno Aces, the Triple-A affiliate of the Arizona Diamondbacks.

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