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Houston Matters

Why Houston’s Gifted and Talented Classes Are Considered ‘Segregated’

In Texas public schools, students who show great promise are supposed to be enrolled in gifted and talented programs where they get extra attention, more challenging work, and with it more funding. But in the Houston Independent School District, students of color are so under-represented that one researcher has called gifted classes there “segregated.” News […]

Gifted and Talented Fernando Aguilar plays with his son Isaac Aguilar

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In Texas public schools, students who show great promise are supposed to be enrolled in gifted and talented programs where they get extra attention, more challenging work, and with it more funding. But in the Houston Independent School District, students of color are so under-represented that one researcher has called gifted classes there "segregated."

News 88.7 education reporter Laura Isensee examines why and how local education officials aim to address the situation.

(Above: Fernando Aguilar plays with his son Isaac Aguilar, 8. He believes Isaac is very smart, especially in math, and is worried he’s not enrolled in classes for gifted and talented students. Credit: Laura Isensee/News 88.7)

MORE:
Why Houston’s Gifted and Talented Classes Are Considered ‘Segregated’ (News 88.7, Sept. 8, 2015)
What It Takes To Enroll A Child In A Gifted And Talented Class (News 88.7, Sept. 9, 2015)