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Making Houston More Walkable: Monday’s Show (July 6, 2015)

Houston motorists often share the road with cyclists and pedestrians, but it’s not always a harmonious relationship. According to the Governors Highway Safety Association, more than 480 pedestrians were killed in Texas in 2014, accounting for about 14 percent of all motor vehicle deaths in the state. In Houston alone, that number rises to more […]

Houston motorists often share the road with cyclists and pedestrians, but it’s not always a harmonious relationship. According to the Governors Highway Safety Association, more than 480 pedestrians were killed in Texas in 2014, accounting for about 14 percent of all motor vehicle deaths in the state. In Houston alone, that number rises to more than 20 percent, according to the Alliance for Biking and Walking, based on data culled from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

Over the next few days, we consider what improvements advocacy groups would like to see to make Houston safer for pedestrians and cyclists, beginning today with pedestrians. We talk with Jay Blazek Crossley, a policy analyst from Houston Tomorrow, about what improvements should be made to make Houston a more walkable city.

Also this hour: Nearly 50 women have flown with NASA since Sally Ride’s first mission in space in 1983. Astronaut Nicole Stott is one of them. Last month, after almost 30 years with the space agency, Stott retired to become a full-time artist and advocate for STEAM education. She tells Houston Matters’ Maggie Martin why.

Then: We talk with Sanjay Ram and Jane Cummins from the Texas Lyceum about their recent visit to the Panama Canal. It’s currently being expanded; the Port of Houston is expanding, too, in order to be able to take in larger vessels that will travel through Latin America.

Plus: On Sunday, midfielder Carli Lloyd led the United States to a 5-2 victory over Japan in the Women’s World Cup soccer final. Lloyd scored three goals — she’s the first player to do so in a tournament final. She was also one of three members of the Houston Dash of the National Women’s Soccer League to play for the U.S. squad, along with midfielder Morgan Brian (the youngest player in the pitch) and defender Meghan Klingenberg. With Houston’s own in the spotlight — at a tournament which typically marks the peak of attention towards women’s soccer worldwide — we talk with Brian Ching, Managing Director of the Houston Dash, about the impact of Sunday’s game and the state of women’s soccer here in Houston and across the globe.

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