Arts & Culture

New African-American Dance Fest Makes Its Debut In Houston

The two-day event is all about black choreographers and dancers.

Picture of Urban Souls dancers
Urban Souls Dance Company at Dance Houston, 2015.

Twelve years ago, Houston-based Urban Souls Dance Company started with humble beginnings. Today, it’s grown from a couple of dancers into a group of 12. “Our mission is really to tell African American stories… to really focus on black expression and black experiences through dance,” says the company’s founder and Artistic Director Harrison Guy.

This weekend’s festival is a momentous occasion for the company — it’s their first. Guy put a lot of thought into curating the program, which he’s named And Still We Dance.

“It really was me bringing in people that I’ve seen dance before and saying, ‘Hey, you have some works with an African American lens or you’re an African American director,’” Guy says. “’There’s some part of the African American spirit that touches your company and I would love for you to showcase that at this festival.”

The youth concert is Friday night, featuring six local companies and one from Lafayette, Louisiana. Saturday’s matinee and evening performances include six local professional companies. 

It’s been about five years since Houston has seen a festival specifically honoring black choreographers and dancers, and Guy says we’re overdue.

“It’s like the more I do, the more I see a need. And so I definitely think this fills a void that has been here for a very long time,” he says.

Urban Souls’ African American Dance Festival, And Still We Dance is Friday and Saturday at the MATCH in Midtown.

 

Editor’s correction: The photo credit has been corrected to say Dance Houston.  

Editor’s note: For full-disclosure, Harrison Guy is employed at Houston Public Media.

Share

Eddie Robinson

Morning News Anchor

A native of Mississippi, Eddie started his radio career as a 10th grader, working as a music jock for a 100,000-Watt (Pop) FM station and a Country AM station simultaneously. While the state's governor nominated him for the U.S. Naval Academy, Eddie had an extreme passion for broadcast media, particularly...

More Information