Music

Houston rapper Megan Thee Stallion’s mother’s gravesite receives security after online threats, doxxing

The threats are a result of an ongoing beef between Megan Thee Stallion and Nicki Minaj. The feud began after Megan Thee Stallion released a new song, “Hiss”, on January 25th.

Megan Thee Stallion returned to her alma mater Texas Southern University to give scholarships to 20 recipients.
Daisy Espinoza / Houston Public Media
Megan Thee Stallion returned to her alma mater Texas Southern University to give scholarships to 20 recipients.

The gravesite of Houston rapper Megan Thee Stallion's mother, Holly Thomas, has received increased security after online threats and alleged doxxing from rapper Nicki Minaj's fans, according to police.

The threats are a result of an ongoing beef between Megan Thee Stallion and Nicki Minaj. The feud began after Megan Thee Stallion released a new song, "Hiss", on January 25th.

In the song, Megan has a line referencing Megan's Law, a federal law that requires law enforcement to make information available to the public regarding registered sex offenders.

"These h— don't be mad at Megan, these h— mad at Megan's Law," Megan rapped.

The line has been mostly interpreted as an apparent diss to Nicki Minaj's husband, Kenneth Petty, who was convicted of attempted rape in 1995 and is a registered sex offender. Minaj also took this as a jab, retaliating on social media and releasing a diss track towards Megan.

On top of Nicki's responses, her fans have also responded to the feud by encouraging others to damage Megan's mother's grave and allegedly doxxing the location of the cemetery where Holly Thomas was laid to rest.

Chad Rogers, Public Information Officer with the Pearland Police Department, said the department was contacted on January 28th by an unknown caller. The caller requested close patrol of Holly Thomas' gravesite, in regards to online threats made relating to the gravesite.

"We are conducting extra patrols in the area throughout the cemetery and around the neighboring area as a deterrent to anyone who is considering doing something very, very stupid," Rogers said.

According to Rogers, this department has previously dealt with cases involving doxxing, but this is a unique situation.

Doxxing is a form of cyberbullying that releases a person's personal information, like their address, phone number, or financial information.

"We've dealt with some of the swatting calls where they invoke a police response," Rogers said. "As far as actual threats to a gravesite, this is the first that I'm aware of."

Officer Rogers said the Pearland Police Department will be on close patrol of the gravesite for the foreseeable future.