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Singles, The Good the Bad and the Ugly, and Melding Classical and Hip-Hop: Houston Matters for Friday, July 11, 2014

According to recent data from the U.S. Census Bureau, Harris County has added 240 thousand residents since just 2010. And many of those new Houstonians (making this one of the fastest-growing communities in the country) are single. And as what constitutes Greater Houston covers a whole lot of territory, we end up with a lot of single […]

According to recent data from the U.S. Census Bureau, Harris County has added 240 thousand residents since just 2010. And many of those new Houstonians (making this one of the fastest-growing communities in the country) are single. And as what constitutes Greater Houston covers a whole lot of territory, we end up with a lot of single newbies, amid a lot of sprawl. That means it’s not especially easy to establish new social circles. As a result, there’s quite an industry here dedicated to bringing people together.

We talk with the organizers of some social clubs for singles in Houston about single life in H-town, and their efforts to bring people together.

Also this hour, from the League City Council banning undocumented children from entering their municipality to concerns over diesel exhaust in Galena Park to Texas ranking 2nd behind Oklahoma in a list of states where “life is most like a country song,” we examine The Good the Bad and the Ugly in Houston news with our rotating panel of “non-experts.” Today, we’re joined by the Houston Chronicle’s Kyrie O’Connor, Texas Originals Producer Paul Pendergraft, and Houston area comedian Ty Mahany.

Plus: Without Beethoven’s Fur Elise, we never would have had Nas’s “I Can.” Billy Joel used Beethoven’s Pathetique in his song “This Night.” Ludacris has sampled from Mozart’s Requiem and Dvorak’s New World Symphony. Janet Jackson’s cribbed from Erik Satie. While we don’t typically think about it, the modern music we listen to, play and compose often has roots in classical music. Which is why it shouldn’t come as a surprise that some modern pop, hip-hop and R&B performers are classically trained. Take for example Princeton Miles. For two years, he served as a Music Lab intern here at Houston Public Media while majoring in vocal performance at the University of Houston’s Moores School of Music, where his primary training was classical. We’ll hear how he’s melded his classical training with his love for R&B and hip-hop, in recording his first EP, called “Hear Me.”

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