Houston Matters

How The Zapruder Film Changed One Family — And The Nation

Now, more than 50 years later, the film is possibly the most iconic video in American history, and Zapruder’s granddaughter, Alexandra Zapruder, has written a book about her family’s connection to this infamous moment.

Zapruder-Film-Wikipedia-Commons

The idea of citizen journalism is fairly familiar these days. We’re used to seeing video footage on the news shot by someone with a smartphone. But one of the first, prominent such instances is the Zapruder film — 26 seconds of footage a bystander named Abraham Zapruder took of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963.

Now, more than 50 years later, the film is possibly the most iconic video in American history, and Zapruder’s granddaughter, Alexandra Zapruder, has written a book about her family’s connection to this infamous moment. And she uses the film to discuss issues such as privacy, public representations of violence, ethics and the media’s role in disseminating information. It’s called Twenty-Six Seconds: A Personal History of the Zapruder Film.

November Event: Alexandra Zapruder will speak in Houston at an event on Sunday (Nov. 5), at the Evelyn Rubenstein Jewish Community Center.

When Zapruder was last in town back in May, she told Houston Matters producer Joshua Zinn about her grandfather and the impact his legendary film had on her family — and the nation.

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