Food

Houston-area stores, organizations offering Thanksgiving meal deals as grocery prices remain high

The cost of the traditional Thanksgiving dinner remains near a record-high this year, according to the American Farm Bureau Federation.

FILE - A plate of roasted turkey and gravy, stuffing, mashed potatoes, and glazed carrots appears in Concord, N.H., on Oct. 2, 2012. The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research looks at the state of the country's Thanksgiving favorites.
AP Photo/Matthew Mead, File
FILE – A plate of roasted turkey and gravy, stuffing, mashed potatoes, and glazed carrots appears in Concord, N.H., on Oct. 2, 2012.

The cost of the traditional Thanksgiving dinner remains near a record-high this year, according to the American Farm Bureau Federation.

It will cost $61.17 to feed up to 10 people, according to the organization’s annual tally of Thanksgiving meal costs. That’s the second-highest ever and just three dollars less than last year’s record amount.

To combat high grocery prices, stores like Target, Wal-Mart, local restaurants, and organizations offer value deals for families who still want to have a traditional dinner.

Target is doing a $25 bundle for a Thanksgiving meal that serves up to four people. On the 23rd, Luby's is doing a Thanksgiving Day special, where they will have meals for $13.99 per person. To help Houstonians combat the increasing grocery prices, local organizations are giving away meals, including the annual Super Feast.

The increase in food prices follows 2022 when Americans spent more on food than ever before. With nearly a $2,500 increase in food costs over the past two years, the increase is a significant financial burden for families, according to experts. An average American family of four could pay almost $15,656 for food annually, an increase in the cost of about 5.8%, according to the 2023 Food and Energy Report by Consumer Energy Alliance.

Food prices are affected as energy prices continue to rise, and families buying the product end up paying the cost to fill in the gap due to inflation.

The president of the Consumer Energy Alliance, David Holt said, fuel prices contribute to the high food prices.

"[Trucking companies are] spending more money on diesel fuel, or natural gas…” Holt said. “And farmers in this country are spending as much as $10 billion more this year.”

The largest expense for trucking companies that deliver food is fuel prices and consumers end up paying the cost when energy prices go up, Holt said.

"If the price of fuel goes up, more than likely you’re passing on those extra costs to the end user,” he said. “The consumer, that family, that’s buying that product."

"Those among us that are in poverty or close to poverty or on fixed incomes are the ones that can least afford to pay more. And they’re the ones that are kind of slipping through the cracks," Holt said.