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Print Media, Flood Prediction, and Co-Working Spaces: Wednesday’s Show (June 8, 2016)

According to print circulation numbers for the top 25 newspapers in the nation — including the Houston Chronicle — there are only two papers from coast to coast that sell more than 500,000 daily print products (and the Chronicle is not one of them). After a decade of decline, is print media still in a nosedive? Will newspapers […]

Michael Hagerty, Houston Public MediaAccording to print circulation numbers for the top 25 newspapers in the nation — including the Houston Chronicle — there are only two papers from coast to coast that sell more than 500,000 daily print products (and the Chronicle is not one of them).

After a decade of decline, is print media still in a nosedive? Will newspapers even be with us in ten years? Or, are intentionally smaller, more focused neighborhood publications supplanting big city papers?

On this edition of Houston Matters, we talk about the changing face of print media with Kristen Hare, a media reporter for Poynter.org, and Cyrus Saatsaz, a journalism professor at the University of Houston.

Also this hour:

New Flood Prediction Technology

Remember when you first upgraded to an HDTV? Suddenly, you were able to see all the detail you didn’t know you were missing.

Well, the National Weather Service will soon make a similar upgrade to its flood prediction technology when it launches its new National Water Model later this summer.

To find out what the National Water Model is — and how it works – Michael Hagerty asks Greg Waller of the National Weather Service’s West Gulf River Forecast Center.

Co-Working Spaces Pop Up in Houston

Co-working spaces are office rental spaces where freelancers or entrepreneurs can go to feel part of an office community. Such spaces are gaining some notice now in Houston. We learn more from Joe Martin, a finance, legal and technology reporter for Houston Business Journal, and Chris Root, the director of operations for Station Houston.

Houston Center for Photography Shows Exhibit Related to Keystone XL Pipeline

Last November (Nov. 6, 2015), President Obama rejected plans for the Keystone XL pipeline, which would have created a newer, shorter pipeline route between Canada and southern Nebraska, connecting up with the already-existing Keystone pipeline, and the Cushing and Gulf Coast extensions which feed into Greater Houston. Local photographer Eric Kayne decided he wanted to tell the stories of those who would be affected most directly by the Keystone XL pipeline, should it come to pass: those whose farms and ranches it would have passed through. So he headed to Nebraska with his camera, and the resulting images have now become an exhibit called In the Path of the Pipeline, on display through July 10 at the Houston Center for Photography. Kayne tells Michael Hagerty about the project.

Houston Matters offers a free daily, downloadable podcast here, on iTunes, Stitcher and various other podcasting apps.

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