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Storm Protection and Rothko Retrospective: Friday’s Show (December 4, 2015)

Research from Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy is offering new solutions to better protect the Houston-Galveston region from the impact of future hurricanes and storms. On this edition of Houston Matters, we talk with three researchers about the legal implications of the proposals, the costs and benefits of each, and how climate change […]

Research from Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy is offering new solutions to better protect the Houston-Galveston region from the impact of future hurricanes and storms.

On this edition of Houston Matters, we talk with three researchers about the legal implications of the proposals, the costs and benefits of each, and how climate change factors in. We also welcome your questions and comments for our guests.

Also this hour: A lot can happen in a week. Some of it good. Some of it bad. Some of it downright ugly. When faced with intriguing developments in the week’s news, we turn to our rotating panel of “non-experts” to parse The Good, The Bad and The Ugly of it all. On today’s panel: Houston Chronicle columnist Lisa Falkenberg, Fred Goodall, author of the parenting blog mochadad.com, and Vlad Davidiuk, Chairman of the College Republicans and Junior Senator in the Student Government Association at the University of St. Thomas. They discuss the implications of Gov. Abbott’s trip to Cuba, Rice University’s decision to remain a gun-free campus, and the Hilton Americas-Houston hotel lobby’s enormous chocolate Christmas display.

Plus: For fans of the famed abstract-expressionist Mark Rothko, there’s no better place to be than Houston right now. The exhibit, Mark Rothko: A Retrospective, is on display now through Jan. 24 at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. And, of course, more of his works can be seen regularly at the Rothko Chapel and the Menil Collection. But while many of Rothko’s works call Houston home, many more do not. After the artist died, his estate gave about half of his works to the National Gallery of Art. Now, the retrospective at the MFAH allows Houstonians to see more than 60 of those works. We learn about the legacy of Mark Rothko – and why Houston is currently the ultimate destination for lovers of his work – from museum director Gary Tinterow, Rothko Chapel executive director David Leslie, and Menil Collection head librarian Eric Wolf.

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