Houston Matters

Local Artists Create Sculptures with Recycled Materials

We’re used to seeing things like ancient tribal masks or great chiseled statues in museums and art galleries. Oftentimes, they’re painstakingly carved out of the finest exotic wood or hammered expertly out of blocks of stone. But a new exhibit by two local artists features sculptures made from more conventional materials, such as masks made […]

We're used to seeing things like ancient tribal masks or great chiseled statues in museums and art galleries. Oftentimes, they're painstakingly carved out of the finest exotic wood or hammered expertly out of blocks of stone.

But a new exhibit by two local artists features sculptures made from more conventional materials, such as masks made from recycled cardboard computer boxes and bright paper cut and curled into shape, or monolithic figures carved with a blowtorch from recycled steel.

The artists are Sherry Tseng Hill, who makes the masks, and Jim Adams, who wields the blowtorch. And their new exhibit at Houston's Archway Gallery is called Masks, Monsters and Monoliths, which runs through Feb. 5.

Houston Matters' Maggie Martin sat down with Jim and Sherry at the gallery to talk about the challenges and rewards of sculpting with recycled material.

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Michael Hagerty

Michael Hagerty

Senior Producer, Houston Matters

Michael Hagerty is the senior producer for Houston Matters. He's spent more than 20 years in public radio and television and dabbled in minor league baseball, spending four seasons as the public address announcer for the Reno Aces, the Triple-A affiliate of the Arizona Diamondbacks.

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