Classical Classroom

Classical Classroom, Episode 61: Motet – Not Lesstet – With Mark Buller

What’s a “motet”, and is it an actual thing? Listen and decide!

Take a tour through music history – from chant to present day – through the lens of the motet. What’s a “motet”, you ask? Is it real, you ask? We are not entirely sure. Composer Mark Buller, whose music has been performed worldwide, and who has been commissioned by organizations like Houston Grand Opera, will be your tour guide. Get on board the great Classroom coaster. We have cupholders and a great soundsystem.

Audio production by Todd “Tween” Hulslander with insightful insight from Dacia Clay.

Music in this episode:

  • Adam de la Halle: “Mout me fu grief li departir/Robins m’aime/Portare”, Tonus Peregrinus/Anthony Pitts
  • Philippe de Vitry: “Garrit gallus flendo dolorose/In nova fert animus/Neuma” Sequentia
  • Palestrina, “Osculetur me osculo oris sui” from Canticum Canticorum, The Hilliard Ensemble
  • Thomas Tallis, “If ye love me”,  The Sixteen/Harry Christophers
  • JS Bach: Lobet den Herrn, alle Heiden, Monteverdi Choir/John Eliot Gardiner
  • W.A. Mozart, Ave verum corpus, The Sixteen/Harry Christophers
  • Richard Strauss: Deutsche Motette, Choir of Gonville & Caius College, Cambridge, Choir of King’s College/David Trendell
  • Morten Lauridsen: O Magnum Mysterium, 1994, Vasari Singers/Jeremy Backhouse
  • Mark Buller: “O nata lux” from Five Motets, Chamber Choir/John Hudson; Mark Buller, piano

For more about Mark Buller, go to www.markbuller.com.

Thumbnail image from manuscript page with the five-voice “Kyrie” of the Missa Virgo Parens Christi by Jacques Barbireau (ca.1420-1491) from Wikimedia Commons.

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