Houston Matters

Princeton Miles: How Classical Training Influenced an R&B Album

Without Beethoven’s Fur Elise, we never would have had Nas’s “I Can.” Billy Joel used Beethoven’s Pathetique in his song “This Night.” Ludacris has sampled from Mozart’s Requiem and Dvorak’s New World Symphony. Janet Jackson’s cribbed from Erik Satie. While we don’t typically think about it, the modern music we listen to, play and compose […]

Without Beethoven’s Fur Elise, we never would have had Nas’s “I Can.” Billy Joel used Beethoven’s Pathetique in his song “This Night.” Ludacris has sampled from Mozart’s Requiem and Dvorak’s New World Symphony. Janet Jackson’s cribbed from Erik Satie.

While we don’t typically think about it, the modern music we listen to, play and compose often has roots in classical music.

Which is why it shouldn’t come as a surprise that some modern pop, hip-hop and R&B performers are classically trained. Take for example Princeton Miles. For two years, he served as a MusicLab intern here at Houston Public Media while majoring in vocal performance at the University of Houston’s Moores School of Music, where his primary training was classical.

But as he tells Houston Public Media’s St. John Flynn – he’s melded his classical training with his love for R&B and hip-hop, in recording his first EP, called “Hear Me.”

More: Full Interview with Princeton Miles

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Michael Hagerty

Michael Hagerty

Senior Producer, Houston Matters

Michael Hagerty is the senior producer for Houston Matters. He's spent more than 20 years in public radio and television and dabbled in minor league baseball, spending four seasons as the public address announcer for the Reno Aces, the Triple-A affiliate of the Arizona Diamondbacks.

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