Texas Democrats and Caucuses

The simple explanation is that counting precinct caucus results is the job of the precinct chairman. The state Party isn't even involved. The state party was trying to keep a running tally of the count for the media, but it's given up on that because the count is so massive and taking longer than anyone expected. State Party spokesman Hector Nieto this is not a problem, because the count will be complete and the results will be ready in time for the county conventions at the end of this month.

"What occurs is the precinct convention chairs send their information to their county chairs, send us a copy just in case to hold that information, and then those county chairs will then prepare for either their county or senatorial conventions, using that information."ξ

The Texas Precinct Caucuses drew national attention and criticism because of the confusion that resulted when more than a million people turned out after the polls closed March 4th. Some Democrats think the caucuses should be abandoned, or at least modified. Nieto says change is always possible, but it has to start at the localξ level.

"If this change is gonna happen it's gonna happen from the grass roots up. If change is going to happen it's gonna happen when somebody submits a resolution, continues to get that resolution through the process, and then finally voted on by thousands of Democrats at our state convention."

The results of the precinct caucuses will allocate 67 of the state's 193 delegates to the Democratic National Convention.ξ Jim Bell, Houston Public Radio News.

 

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