Neighborhood Complaints Lead to Seizure of Animals in Inhumane Conditions

Officer Christopher Miller say neighbors alerted police earlier this week after seeing goats wandering in a neighborhood on Telephone Road near Almeda-Genoa.

Trucks to remove seized animals"Because the goats were, I guess, so hungry that they would go and eat on everybody's plants and find food in the trash and everything, so that's the very first call we got. And we made several trips out here, we just could never get on the property because no one was here and we couldn't even see the animals. So you have to actually go on the property to actually view the animals and the condition."

Monica Schmidt with the Houston Humane Society says there were multiple goat carcasses, as well as dead chickens, ducks and pigs. But some live animals were seized by animal welfare officials:

"Twelve goats, six pigs, two calves, four chickens, one rooster, two ducks and two dogs." 

Schmidt says the Humane Society will look after the animals while the case is being adjudicated.

"They'll be evaluated by our medical staff and we will hold them until the court goes to trial. They will have a civil hearing on February 28th to deem that the animals have now been released to our custody. At that time it will go to the DA's office to determine whether or not they'll seek criminal charges."

Trucks to remove seized animalsBARC Animal Control Supervisor Jarrad Mears says the property owner claims he had hired someone to take care of the animals.

"It's terrible. They were in pathetic shape. It's just sad to see animals suffering like that. You know, there's multiple avenues that the owner could have reached out, like Miss Schmidt just said, you know. He could have received help if he would have asked." 

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