Tuesday AM August 11th, 2009

A manager is often an unsung hero who has to adapt to demands from all sides, but usually with little or no training.ξ Management coach Dan Bobinski says the idea is to motivate without manipulating.

"Motivation literally means 'a reason to move.'ξ And people have their own reasons to move.ξ We can't give them, they already have them.ξ And our jobs as managers is to help those people see how those motivations tie in to the company vision and mission."

Ed:ξ "Finding out those reasons, does that mean in a general way, or does that mean specific to the people you're dealing with?"

"Specifically to the people you're dealing with.ξ I encourage managers to look at their employees as if they were plants and the manager was a gardener.ξ The gardener's job is to create the right conditions for each individual plant, and then the plant will thrive."

Bobinski says tapping natural motivations can help achieve consistent, sustained top performance from teams.

"Managers holding people down to the rule, so to speak, and trying to enforce compliance, people don't feel free to engage there.ξ A manager who lets someone explore, who allows mistakes to happen and make sure that everybody learns from mistakes, who encourages creativity, encourages the 'a-ha!'--those are the managers that people like to work for.ξ Spend the time, invest the time, become a student of that employee, and then create an environment for that person to really thrive."

Creating Passion-Driven Teams: How to Stop Micromanaging and Motivate People to Top Performance is from Career Press.ξ

Ed Mayberry, KUHF Houston Public Radio News.

 

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