Tragedy in Mumbai Results in Solidarity

The carnage in the city of Mumbai, formerly known at Bombay, resulted in the deaths of nearly two hundred locals and foreigners. The American Jewish Committee held a solidarity briefing to denounce the terrorist act.

Rabbi Moishe Traxler:

"There were many who passed away. Each one of them had the potential to give that no longer is here. It's our job to see to it that that potential isn't lost, by increasing in goodness in goodness and kindness. I think that the mission has to be to see, to reveal within our children, that they each have love in their home, they have love from their neighbors, and love from each and every person, to see to it that this evil is overwhelmed with goodness."

Asher Yarden is Consul General of Israel.

"They say that terror is blind. Well, I think that this is not really the case. The perpetrators knew so very well what they were doing when they attacked the civilian population of India, alongside with citizens of 17 other countries in Mumbai. They knew exactly where to hit, in order to cause the maximum damage possible. They tried to maximize the damage, they tried to kill as many civilians as possible."
image of Houston Congressman Al Green
Among the 19-foreigners killed were six Americans. Houston Congressman Al Green sits on the Homeland Security Committee.

"I understand that protecting the homeland requires that we care about people in distant places, distant lands, if you will. It is exceedingly important for us, those of us in this country, to care about what happens to people in every corner of the world when they are assaulted in this fashion. We cannot allow these kinds of dastardly deeds to go unchecked."

image of Vice Consul Mitchell JeffreyVice Consul Mitchell Jeffrey with the British Consulate in Houston...says while it's a tragedy that lives were lost, he thinks democracy is being put to the test.

"We are one peoples, whether we want to agree with that or not but, in the end, I think there will be solidarity and understanding of why it's important we stand up to this and get back to the fundamental relationships that are there, the good ones, the trade, the academic exchanges, the education, the institutions and understand that this is a time for the world to pull together."

Despite differences, participants stood together to fight against the atrocities against humanity.

Pat Hernandez, KUHF...Houston Public Radio News.
Tags: News, World

 

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