Education News

How HISD Plans to Improve its Struggling Schools, and Avoid Board of Managers

That plan involves more support for students who live in poverty.

Houston ISD Superintendent Richard Carranza comments during the State of the Schools luncheon at the Hilton of the Americas, February 15, 2017.
Houston ISD Superintendent Richard Carranza comments during the State of the Schools luncheon at the Hilton of the Americas, February 15, 2017.

The Houston school district is trying to improve struggling schools, as it faces the risk of an outside board of managers appointed by the state.

That plan involves more support for students who live in poverty, because Houston’s schools that have failed state standards don’t just have academic challenges.

“There’s issues of inter-generational poverty. There’s issues of homelessness. There’s issues of drug addiction,” said HISD Superintendent Richard Carranza on Houston Matters.

“And as students bring those issues with them to school, we’re providing wraparound services and partnering with community agencies.”

Carranza calls his plan “Achieve 180.” It also tries to put proven school leaders and highly skilled teachers at schools that the state says “need improvement.”

“So it’s really a comprehensive approach taking on all 32 schools that — again, not all 32 are an improvement required — but if a school just came out of improvement required, that’s a very tenuous situation to continue to provide supports supports and resources,”  Carranza said.

Under the state law known as House Bill 1842, HISD must improve all its schools that have chronically failed state standards by August 2018. Otherwise, the Texas Education commissioner can appoint a board of managers to replace the entire district’s elected board, or start closing down struggling schools.

 

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Laura Isensee

Laura Isensee

Education Reporter

Laura Isensee covers education for Houston Public Media, including K-12 and higher education. Previously, she was a staff reporter at The Miami Herald and contributed to South Florida’s NPR affiliate. Her work has also appeared in The Dallas Morning News, Reuters and Clarín in Argentina. Laura has won awards for...

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