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UPDATE: Court Partly Reinstates Trump Travel Ban, Trump Calls Decision A Victory

The justices will hear arguments in the case in the fall. Read the full ruling of the Supreme Court below.

Protesters hold signs and march in front of the State Capitol across the street from the US 4th Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va., Monday, May 8, 2017. The court will examine a ruling that blocks the administration from temporarily barring new visas for citizens of Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. It’s the first time an appeals court will hear arguments on the revised travel ban, which is likely destined for the U.S. Supreme Court.

The Latest on the Supreme Court’s decision on the Trump administration’s travel ban (all times local):

12:15 p.m.

President Donald Trump is hailing Monday’s Supreme Court decision on his controversial travel ban as a “clear victory for our national security.”

Trump says in a statement that his “number one responsibility” is to keep the American people safe.

The nation’s highest court on Monday said it would let a limited version of Trump’s ban on travel from six mostly Muslim countries take effect. The ban on visitors from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen can be enforced as long if those visitors lack a “credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States.”

The justices will hear full arguments in the October.

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10:33 a.m.

The Supreme Court is letting the Trump administration mostly enforce its 90-day ban on travelers from six mostly Muslim countries, overturning lower court orders that blocked it.

The action Monday is a victory for President Donald Trump in the biggest legal controversy of his young presidency.

The court did leave one category of foreigners protected, those “with a credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States,” the court said in an unsigned opinion.

The justices will hear arguments in the case in October.

Trump said last week that the ban would take effect 72 hours after being cleared by courts.

The ban would apply to citizens of Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen.

The Trump administration said the ban was needed to allow an internal review of the screening procedures for visa applicants from those countries.

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3:10 a.m.

The focus is on the Supreme Court as the high-stakes legal fight over President Donald Trump’s travel ban awaits action by the justices.

The court is expected to decide within days whether the Trump administration can enforce a ban on visitors to the U.S. from six mostly Muslim countries — Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen.

Trump rolled out a travel ban just a week after his Jan. 20 inauguration, but lower federal courts have blocked it and a revised version — and one court also has blocked a 120-day halt on refugee arrivals in the United States.

The president casts the travel ban as critical to deterring possible terrorist attacks in the United States. Opponents say it targets Muslims in violation of federal law and the Constitution.

 

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