Houston Matters

When Friendliness Becomes a Disorder: Inside Williams Syndrome in ‘The Boy Who Loved Too Much’

We’ve all known someone who seems a little too friendly. Maybe they don’t get certain social cues or boundaries. Or perhaps you’ve known someone who was too trusting or naive about people’s intentions. Well, all that pales in comparison with those who are diagnosed with Williams Syndrome, a genetic disorder that makes it biologically impossible for someone to […]

Journalist Jennifer Latson. (Photo Courtesy: Simon & Schuster)
(Above: Journalist Jennifer Latson. Photo Courtesy: Simon & Schuster

We’ve all known someone who seems a little too friendly. Maybe they don’t get certain social cues or boundaries. Or perhaps you’ve known someone who was too trusting or naive about people’s intentions.

Well, all that pales in comparison with those who are diagnosed with Williams Syndrome, a genetic disorder that makes it biologically impossible for someone to distrust anyone. They see everyone as a friend and are unconditionally loving toward everyone they ever meet.

Journalist Jennifer Latson (formerly of the Houston Chronicle) takes readers inside the world of a young man with Williams syndrome in her book The Boy Who Loved Too Much: A True Story of Pathological Friendliness.

Houston Public Media’s Dacia Clay talks with Latson about the three years she spent chronicling the experiences of 12-year-old Eli D’Angelo.

Latson will sign copies of her book tonight (June 20, 2017) at 7 at an event at Brazos Bookstore.

Share